How do we measure success in society

The social problems that many charities address are an affront to us. With prayer will come the real success of this life. We cannot buy a devoted husband or wife or loving children. We are going to have more and better information about our hospitals, government departments, our politicians.

Recognising a valid and serious social need is not enough. We can also apply the concept to society: Success, according to this scale, means the clothes we wear and the car we drive. It means struggling every day of our lives to be better and more faithful to what we are called to be.

They deal with people. What are we currently paying attention to? In the United States, many people measure success through wealth.

Success, on that day, will be whether or not we responded straight away when we heard the Adhan, the call to Prayer.

The way we behave and the way we speak tells others about Islam, far more than our speeches about faith can ever do.

We measure success by how many exams we pass or by the kind of university degree we take or by the job we get. We have certain obligations which we must fulfill, before anything else. So how would scrutiny work when it comes to improving charity performance?

How is success measured in society?

I believe a new institution is needed, to sit alongside the Charity Commission, concerned with assessing and improving the performance of charities. The saying "what gets measured, gets managed" is the business equivalent of the idea that our thoughts shape our reality.

Performance assessment and the publication of results are now so pervasive that it is hard to see how charities can escape. There is no body charged with producing independent, credible, objective assessments of charities.So, how do we decide what “key success measures” are most valuable to guide strategic decision making?

Stephen Haines and associates make several recommendations. They caution us to avoid “comprehensive activity measures” and instead focus on high level metrics that measure progress toward achieving an organization’s vision, mission.

Measuring Our Success as a Society

We measure success by how many exams we pass or by the kind of university degree we take or by the job we get. Success, according to this scale, means the clothes we wear and the car we drive. Having more and more things, we are judged to be a success.

Second, we don't discriminate between charities. Instead, we think only of "charity" - a homogenous group - even though most of us can name a few individual ones. There are lots of examples of us talking about "charity" in such a way. Some of the costs of calls to the Big Brother phone line are donated to "charity".

Society changes quite frequently, because as new generations come and go, the school systems also come and go, shining their light and motives onto our society. The new school life is not easy to describe in words; it is a difference in.

Measures of success

And do we want to measure (pay attention to) something else if we want to create a more inclusive, equitable, just, and ecologically sustainable society? Gross Domestic Product (GDP) The dominant economic measurement today is the Gross Domestic Product (GDP).

Yes, money is the measure of success in nowadays society. Without money, no one on the earth can succeed in life. For example, a person without money that all of us knew is a beggar.

That is what will happen if one don't have money in his or her pocket. Money even can become a factor that raise conflict in family.

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How do we measure success in society
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